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Visits and Events 2018-2019

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Visits and Events 2018-2019

 

FALL SEMESTER 2018

 

DUNCAN WATTS—Campus Visit:  September 12-14, 2018

Public Lecture

Thursday, September 13, 2018

4:30 pm

FROM SMALL-WORLD NETWORKS TO COMPUTATIONAL SOCIAL SCIENCE:

TWO DECADES OF RESEARCH IN BETWEEN DISCIPLINES

G10 Biotech

Free and open to the public

 

JOHN RICKFORD—Campus Visit:  September 16-22, 2018

Public Lecture

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

4:30 pm

Klarman Hall Auditorium

Free and open to the public

CLASS AND RACE IN THE ANALYSIS OF LANGUAGE VARIATION AND THE STRUGGLE FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE

In this talk, I will draw on 50+ years of research to address our theoretical understandings of the roles of race and class in sociolinguistic variation, and our applied efforts to curtail the discrimination and injustice experienced by African American and other vernacular speakers in schools, police interactions, courtrooms, job hunts and other aspects of social life.

On the theoretical/descriptive side, although social class/socioeconomic status was at the heart of the genesis of quantitative socio-inguistics in the 1960s, it has been pursued with less frequency and conviction since then.  However, class does remain very relevant to sociolinguistic variation, and recent models of social class variation in sociology offer new strategies for pursuing it. Other theoretical issues that have never been adequately explored are the nature of ethnicity as a sociolinguistic boundary and why and how race came to triumph over class as the basis of socio-political action and speech alignment in the US.

On the applied side, we have only recently begun to document the extent to which speakers of African American Vernacular English [AAVE] are discriminated against in US courtrooms because of jurors’ unfamiliarity with and prejudice against their dialect. Rickford and King (2016) demonstrate, for instance, that the vital courtroom testimony of Rachel Jeantel in the 2013 Florida trial of George Zimmerman for the murder of Trayvon Martin was neither understood nor believed mainly because it was delivered in AAVE.  Jones et al (2018) provide other compelling evidence that US court reporters simply do not understand AAVE speakers well enough.  Other cases from the US, UK and the Caribbean suggest that this is part of a more general problem, exacerbated when the speaker is a person of color.  And Voigt et al (2016) demonstrate that race is the salient basis of the relative respect shown (through language) to motorists stopped by Oakland police officers, regardless of whether the police officers are themselves Black or White.  Finally, there is recent evidence that re-segregation is increasing in the US since court-ordered  efforts against it have been relaxed, with dire consequences for literacy education and unjust incarceration among Black and Brown populations.  How linguists can best respond to these challenges is something we urgently need to decide, and act on.

 

DAVID HILLIS—Campus Visit:  September 23-29, 2018

Symposium

Monday, September 24, 2018

Lab of Ornithology

EvoEvent

EXPLORING THE TREE OF LIFE:  PHYLOGENETICS, SPECIMEN-BASED RESEARCH, AND COMPARATIVE BIOLOGY

Advanced sign-up is necessary- the link is forthcoming

 

XU BING—Campus Visit:  September 25-October 2, 2018

Public Lecture

On “The Character of Characters”

Friday, Sept. 28, 2018

5:15 pm

Wing Lecture Room, Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art

Presented in conjunction with the Cornell Council on the Arts Biennale

https://museum.cornell.edu/exhibitions/xu-bing-character-characters

Free and open to the public

BRINDA SOMAYA—Campus Visit:  October 21-27, 2018

Public Lecture

Tuesday, October 23, 2018

5:00-6:15 pm

Klarman Hall Auditorium

WORKS & CONTINUITIES

“Architecture has to go beyond buildings,

beyond the physical and extend into the soul, without feeling that one is compromising on creativity or the thrill and excitement of design.”

  • Brinda Somaya

Experiencing growth and transformation as a nation, India is juxtaposed with projects to reveal the journey of a country and an architect, hand in hand. Brinda Somaya is part of the “Bridge Generation”, a term she coined to define a rarely identified generation that “bridged” the architectural space between the Masters and the current generation. These are architects born after India got her Independence in 1947, and who grew and practised in a free India.

A chronicle of the volume of works in the recently published architectural monograph titled “Brinda Somaya – Works & Continuities,” explores Somaya’s story through her own voice and illustrates the diverse typology of work she has built over 40 years. This monograph is a manifestation of her prolific practice while her presentation gives a glimpse into her personal narrative and the story of her studio, Somaya & Kalappa Consultants (SNK) and how it continues to engage with a diverse and multicultural India. Dialogues with professionals from various fields raise interesting questions about practice in the seventies when the studio was established, and the time when modernity in India was becoming more apparent. Living and working from Mumbai has been an integral part of Somaya’s journey. This shared narrative will bring out the extended role she plays as an architect that goes beyond building as she works at various levels with the urban and rural context sensitively transforming the built and unbuilt environment. Another important aspect of her practice is how architecture is also an art and is unique to its cultural and social fabric.

Free and open to the public

 

 

 SPRING SEMESTER 2019

 

MARGARET MARTONOSI—Campus Visit:  January 22-26, 2019

 

LAURIE MARKER—Campus Visit:  April 8-12, 2019