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Visits and Events 2019-2020

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Visits and Events 2019-2020

UPCOMING – FALL 2020 

Xu Bing (Arts) – September 8-14, 2020

 

Carl Wieman (Physical Sciences) – September 27-October 2, 2020

 

SPRING 2020 

Keri Putnam (Arts) – April 12-17, 2020

In accordance with University policies regarding COVID-19, this visit has been canceled and will be rescheduled to a future date.

 

Wynton Marsalis (Arts) – March 15-21, 2020

PERFORMANCE

CANCELED: Wynton Marsalis, Guest Artist: Cornell Music Department

3/11/2020 UPDATE:
In accordance with University policies regarding COVID-19, this concert has been canceled and will be rescheduled for fall 2020.

Please not that tickets issued for March 20 will not be valid for the rescheduled concert.

Friday, March 20, 2020

7:30 pm

Bailey Hall

Cornell University welcomes Pulitzer and Grammy-winning artist Wynton Marsalis to the Ithaca campus as an A.D. White Professor-at-Large.

Marsalis performs with the Cornell Wind Symphony, conducted by James Spinazzola (Cornell Music)

The Cornell Jazz Ensemble, directed by Paul Merrill (Cornell Music), performs Marsalis’ piece, Big Train, with guest trombonist Wycliffe Gordon.

An advanced free ticket is required. Tickets available at baileytickets.com.

 

Professor David J. Stevenson (Physical Science) – Feb. 16-23, 2020

COLLOQUIUM

General Physics Colloquium: Jupiter’s Interior as Revealed by Juno 

Monday, February 17, 2020

4:00 pm

Schwartz Auditorium, Rockefeller Hall

Abstract: Jupiter is in the class of planets that we call gas giants, not because they consist of gas but because they were primarily made from hydrogen-helium gas, which upon gravitational compression becomes a metallic fluid. Juno, in orbit about Jupiter since 2016, has changed our view: The planet may have a diluted central concentration of heavy elements, consistent with current ideas of formation. It has winds that are limited by magnetic effects but extend to ~3000km in-depth and are evident in the gravity field. It has a distinctive magnetic field and evidence for secular variation consistent with those winds, and an atmosphere that is surprisingly inhomogeneous because of the peculiarities of the water-ammonia phase diagram. However, Juno is ongoing; it has not answered all questions and has posed new ones.

DISCUSSION

The Hunting of the Snark

Wednesday, February 19, 2020

7:15 pm

Keeton House

Abstract: In Lewis Carroll’s famous poem, the Bellman proclaimed that it was “…Just the place for a Snark! I have said it thrice: What I tell you three times is true.” This perfectly describes the current obsession with habitability and the notion that we know where to look when we seek out “Earthlike” planets. I will explain why I think this is mistaken; that in fact, our notion of habitability is very anthropocentric, that we don’t know where to look and that the history of science teaches us to expect a surprise when we finally encounter extraterrestrial life.

Reference: https://physicstoday.scitation.org/doi/10.1063/PT.3.4054

 

FALL 2019

Professor Andrew Dobson (Life Science) – Nov. 10-15, 2019

SEMINAR

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Weekly Seminar—Population Dynamics of Infectious Diseases in Group Living Species: Models and Insights from Yellowstone Wolves

12:20 pm

Corson Mudd Hall A106

 

Professor Steven Levitsky (Social Science) – Nov. 3-9. 2019

SEMINAR

Latin American Studies—Democracy in Latin America After the Left Turn

Monday, November 4, 2019

4:30-6:00 pm

Hollis E. Cornell Auditorium

132 Goldwin Smith Hall

PUBLIC LECTURE

How Democracies Die:  U.S. Democracy Three Years After Trump’s Election

Thursday, November 7, 2019

4:30-5:45 pm

Klarman Hall Auditorium

 

Professor Stephen Quake (Life Science) – Oct. 7-11, 2019

SEMINAR & PANEL DISCUSSION

Academic Entrepreneurship: Creating Impact Beyond Publishing Papers…

Panel Discussion to Follow with David Putnam, professor of Biomedical Engineering, Andrea Katherine Ippolito, lecturer in Civil and Environmental Engineering, and moderator David Erickson, professor of mechanical engineering and director of the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Cornell

Monday, October 7, 2019

3:30-5:00 pm

Statler Auditorium 185

5:00-6:00pm        Reception in the Statler Hotel to follow

KEYNOTE LECTURE

2nd Annual Intercampus Campus Symposium

Friday, October 11, 2019

8:00-5:00 pm

Lecture Hall 1

College of Veterinary Medicine

Organized in conjunction with Cornell Center on the Physics of Cancer Metabulism,
Cornell Center for Immunology, Weill Cornell Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center

Cancer research at Cornell spans a broad range of research excellence on both the Ithaca and New York City campuses. To maximize synergies between established areas of strengths and to develop new collaborations, the 2nd Annual Inter-campus Cancer Symposium will be held on October 11th, 2019 at the College of Veterinary Medicine.

The symposium will feature two world-leading experts in cancer immuno-therapy and biotechnology in addition to faculty talks from Cornell’s different colleges and Weill Cornell Medicine. Moreover, a representative of the American Cancer Society will lead a workshop on funding opportunities for registered junior faculty, trainees, and research pre- and post-award staff.  A panel discussion on the state of cancer research at Cornell with university leaders will conclude the event.

There will be ample opportunities to interact during a poster session. All PhD students and postdocs are strongly encouraged to highlight their exciting work and provide a framework for lively discussions.

Please use the link below to register for the event.

Registration for 2nd Annual Intercampus Cancer Symposium

All Ithaca attendees must register by September 25th. Attendees from NYC must register by September 18th to allow for help with travel arrangements.